scolding. purple belt

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It was not long before supper was on the table and in spite of all the bread-and-butter he had eaten Button-Bright had a fine appetite for the good things Trot’s mother had cooked. Mrs. Griffith was very kind to the children, but not quite so agreeable toward poor Cap’n Bill. When the old sailorman at one time spilled some tea on the tablecloth, Trot’s mother flew angry and gave the culprit such a tongue-lashing that Button-Bright was sorry for him. But Cap’n Bill was meek and made no reply. "He’s used to it, you know," whispered Trot to her new friend, and indeed, Cap’n Bill took it all cheerfully and never minded a bit. Then it came Trot’s turn to get a scolding. purple belt
When she opened the parcel she had bought at the village, it was found she had selected the wrong color of yarn, and Mrs. Griffith was so provoked that Trot’s scolding was almost as severe as that of Cap’n Bil l. Tears came to the little girl’s eyes, and to comfort her the boy promised to take her to the village next morning with his magic umbrella, so she could exchange the yarn for the right color. Trot quickly brightened at this promise, although Cap’n Bill looked grave and shook his head solemnly. When supper was over and Trot had helped with the dishes, she joined Button-Bright and the sailorman on the little porch again. Dusk had fallen, and the moon was just rising. They all sat in silence for a time and watched the silver trail that topped the crests of the waves far out to sea. orange belt "Oh, Button-Bright!" cried the little girl presently. "I’m so glad you’re going to let me fly with you way to town and back tomorrow. Won’t it be fine, Cap’n Bill?" "Dunno, Trot," said he. "I can’t figger how both of you can hold on to the handle o’ that umbrel." Trot’s face fell. "I’ll hold on to the handle," said Button-Bright, "and she can hold on to me. It doesn’t pull hard at all. best belts
You’ve no idea how easy it is to fly that way after you get used to it." "But Trot ain’t used to it," objected the sailor. "If she happened to lose her hold and let go, it’s goodbye Trot. I don’t like to risk it, for Trot’s my chum, an’ I can’t afford to lose her." "Can’t you tie us together, then?" asked the boy. "We’ll see, we’ll see," replied Cap’n Bill, and began to think very deeply. He forgot that he didn’t believe the umbrella could fly, and after Button-Bright and Trot had both gone to bed, the old sailor went out into the shed and worked a while before he, too, turned into his "bunk.

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